Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Inspiración…finds around the Garden

Dahhling here are a few of my favorites currently available all over this wondrous Garden.

1Fish 2Fish

Habersham Antiques

Antiques Emporium

Magnolias Antiques

Magnolias Antiques

37th Street Antiques

anything gorgeous thus far?

Magnolias Antiques

37th Street Antiques

37th Street Antiques

37th Street Antiques


Habersham Antiques

Maggies Antiques

Habersham Antiques

Arcanum

Arcanum
Arcanum

Arcanum

Habersham Antiques
The Paris Market

The Paris Market

The Paris Market

Alex Raskin Antiques

Alex Raskin Antiques

Sylvester & Co.

Alex Raskin Antiques

Alex Raskin Antiques
37th Street Antiques

37th Street Antiques

Habersham Antiques

The Paris Market
Habersham Antiques

Habersham Antiques


Habersham Antiques
37th Street Antiques

37th Street Antiques

Habersham Antiques
Magnolia Antiques
Magnolia Antiques
Magnolia Antiques

Magnolia Antiques
Habersham Antiques
Hope you enjoyed the tour.
Until soonest.

HRH
The Duchess of State

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Porcelains: Tag sale meets Goldwyn by Meito china

I must tell you dahhling that I am by no means a snob about porcelains, fine china or regular modern day dinnerware…I love them all equally. To me the beauty of an item is not directly linked to its value, age or history.  True many pieces that meet those qualifications can be spectacular and can give one a thrill to discover in a antique shop.  However to me, I find the beauty of all dinnerware, made centuries ago or made a year ago, based on the overall pattern, color, size & the limitless bounds of my tablescape imagination! In truth I find that even the most common and humble ceramic plates when mixed and cha-chad up can be quite spectacular. 



A great example are a dozen plates I found at a Tag Sale…I know what you are thinking dahhling and before you say it, let me just tell you that this is just not any Tag Sale but an event that is waited for with bated breath every year.  Saint John’s Episcopalian yearly Tag Sale.  The congregation of Saint John’s Episcopalian beautiful church are some of the best known members of La Sociedad in the Garden.  Attending service there any given Sunday is like taking a tour of the Met’s Costume Institute (Dior, Chanel, Yves St Laurent, Balenciaga…dahhling you name it is properly represented), not that they are known for their singing abilities (No, you won’t see any of them trying to compete in some horrid national signing television show!) but they are renowned for their giving spirit.  Hence the Annual Tag Sale.  Every year members of the congregation attempt to outdo themselves to see who can give the most spectacular things from their dusty manse’s attics (from Sea Island to Palmetto Bluff, all corners of the Garden and beyond) the result? An extravaganza of objects that give you a glimpse of its donors… since it does raise funds for good causes including the upkeep of the beautiful Green-Meldrim House, I make it a point to do my part in supporting the cause.




This year I found a set of (12) dinner plates, all bundled up with masking tape, lest one loose its way from the others (I didn’t say it was a glamorous Tag Sale dahhling!) and though the Baron who was with me at the time thought I was wasting all of $7 dollars, it is because of their worn and faded crests and antique gold bands that I liked them so!  The marking on the plates say: Homer Laughlin China (Seville). 

The Homer Laughlin China Company owes its origin to a two-kiln pottery on the banks of the Ohio River in East Liverpool, Ohio. Built in 1871 by Homer Laughlin and his brother Shakespeare, the Laughlin Pottery was one of the first whiteware plants in the country.

In 1897, Mr. Laughlin sold his interest to William Edwin Wells and Louis I Aaron. Since then, successive generations of the two families have continued to manage the company. In 1907, the headquarters and a new 30-kiln plant were built across the Ohio River in Newell, West Virginia, the present manufacturing and headquarters location.  The turning point in the artistic focus of the company came in 1927 with the addition of noted ceramist Frederick Hurton Rhead. His design vision would culminate in the 1936 introduction of Fiesta®, Homer Laughlin's bestselling line, and today one of the most collected china products in the world.  Until 1959, Homer Laughlin made only semi-vitrified earthenware products for the consumer markets. With the introduction of a new, fully vitrified china line, the company was now able to participate in the restaurant/hotel markets.

The hotel/restaurant introduction was such a success that Homer Laughlin concentrated its efforts on the foodservice market and continued to add new shapes, patterns and decorating techniques throughout the 60's and 70's. The reintroduction of Fiesta® in 1986 as a high-fire, fully vitrified, lead-free product redefined the standard for both food service and retail china products.



The scalloped amber colored salad plates came from a hole in the wall tiny antique store (recently opened).  The plates were taged 1940’s but have no markings.  I liked the color & the shape. I think they add a nice contrast to the cream color & faded antique gold band & crest of the Homer Laughlin China ¿no?

The beautiful hand painted soup bowls (a set of 10) were found at the charming antique shop “Antiques & Such” in Beaufort, South Carolina when the Duke & I were there for an afternoon stroll and late lunch at the FAB restaurant: Wren.  The pieces were made by F. B Meito China, the pattern is: Goldwyn.




The company was founded in 1908 as Nagoya Seito Sho by former Noritake engineer Kotero Asukai. Production bore the backstamp "Meito," which means "fine sword" or "excellent sword." The name is, no doubt, a nod to the company's headquarters in Nagoya, Japan, a city famed for its shrine of the sacred sword that is one of Japan's crown jewels.


Meito was acquired by Sumitomo Steel Corporation during World War II, and Sumitomo changed the company name to Narumi Seito Narumi but continued to use the Meito backstamps. Continuing production during the American Occupation, Meito expanded into the American market with showrooms in New York, Chicago, Dallas, and New Orleans. Meito backstamps tell the story of the major production lines. They typically indicate the line, as well as the particular pattern, and each line has a specific shape.


So dahhling don’t be so quick to dismiss something because it lacks the pedigree of some of the other pieces in your collections…you never know what you might find ¿no?

Until soonest…

HRH
The Duchess of State
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